Click on Java the Tree Dragon (RIP) to head on over to the facebook page. i-Biology is for MrT‘s IB Biology and MYP Science students. Find out more on the About pages. Please read and adhere to these guidelines on fair use and consider a donation to charity via my gift list at Biology4Good.

i-Biology.net is slowly being updated for the current IB Biology subject guide (teacher support material here). For other up-to-date free resources, check out Bioknowledgy & BioNinja

Disclaimer: this is a voluntary project not endorsed by the IB. Teachers must use their judgment and the most up-to-date advice in subject guides and reports before making use of materials here. 

Making Learning Visible in Parent-Student-Teacher Conferences

Wayfinder Learning Lab

“Children grow into the intellectual life around them.” 

(Vygotsky, quoted by Ron Ritchhart)

Screen Shot 2018-11-02 at 2.05.10 PMI really enjoy parent-student-teacher conferences. (I’d rather do more of these and less report writing, but that’s a different post.) Even with a limited time-slot (my last couple of schools have been 10mins), we have an opportunity to strengthen a home-school connection, build a relationship with families and really put the learner and learning front and centre.

I love being a science teacher, and parent-student-teacher conferences are a prime opportunity to share that. Just because it’s high school, doesn’t mean it needs to be too serious.

Over the last five years or so of teaching…

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Creating Cultures of Thinking: Summary Cards

Making Feedback Visible: Four Levels in Action

An updated format on a feedback method I started using five years ago. Saves time, puts students in charge. Give it a go!

Wayfinder Learning Lab

Five years ago I was starting to become concerned with the difference between marking and feedback. What was making a difference to my students’ learning and was the effort I was putting into detailed marking worth it in terms of their improvement? In reading Hattie’s Visible Learning for Teachers, Wiliam’s Embedded Formative Assessment and the pdf of The Power of Feedback (Hattie & Timperley), I developed a four-levels feedback template for use on student work.

This post is to share an updated version – I still really like this method of giving timely, actionable, goal-focused and student-owned feedback. It definitely saves me time, but puts the focus of feedback on what’s most important for the student to take the next step. I’ll keep updating, editing and adding to this post.

When giving feedback on a piece of work, I paste this at the top of…

View original post 755 more words

Ladder of Feedback

I use the Ladder of Feedback from Project Zero a lot with students and in workshops/ proijects, but I really like this version adapted by Sonya Terborg, adding “Thanks” at the end. Give it a go!

sonya terborg

Ladder of Feedback

I am working with MYP students on a Design unit at the moment in which they are designing a solution under the umbrella topic of “Improving Lives”. Everyone is at the stage of needing feedback on ideas in order to help inform their decision of which idea to pursue in more detail. To guide this process, I went in search of a thinking routine or protocol that might provide some structure to this feedback.

I was initially inspired by a Mind/Shift post on Developing Students’ Ability to Give and Take Effective Feedback.  It detailed a High School idea of using DeBono’s thinking hats to guide feedback and a modified ‘warm/cool’ feedback protocol for primary students. While these ideas got me thinking, I was looking for something a little more in depth than the warm/cool and a little more structured – or more specifically, something with a more defined structure…

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The Path to ATP

Back in 2014Eleanor Lutz created “How To Build A Human” which has been shared a lot recently – so I went back to her blog to see what is there and wow!

Here is a new (and helpful) infographic for HL Bio, “The Path to ATP”. Think a simpler version of Gerhad Michel’s famous Roche Biochemical Pathways.

Read the rest of this entry

In Our Time: Science (Nature of Science)

600x600bbIf you’re into storytelling and discussion, why not try BBC Radio 4’s “In Our Time: Science” podcast. Good for Nature of Science and TOK connections in IB Biology… and great if you have a commute to kill. Click here for all episodes in alphabetical order.

For more NOS resources, check out Simon Underhill’s blog.

 

Wayfinders: Curriculum as a Compass

If you love knowing stuff, learning stuff, inquiry, imagery and Moana as much as I do, then you might like the latest post on my ideas blog: “Curriculum as a Compass?“.

MoanaMaui

The apprentice becomes a wayfinder in her own right. [gif source]

Go for the big ideas, stay for the Moana gifs.

Content & Inquiry in a Google World

Space Twins & Epigenetics

1600px-mark_and_scott_kelly_at_the_johnson_space_center2c_houston_texas

Mark and Scott Kelly at the Johnson Space Center, Houston Texas. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Sign up for the Teach.Genetics mailing list from GSLC here. 

The ever-wonderful Genetic Science Learning Center at the University of Utah sent this helpful email update to counter misconceptions around the Kelly Twins’ “Genetic Differences” as a result of Scott’s year on the International Space Station.

You may have seen the headlines about identical twin astronauts, Mark and Scott Kelly, now being “genetically different” after Scott spent a year in space while Mark remained on Earth. Yet much of the popular press has failed to explain that these differences are mostly epigenetic modifications leading to changes in gene expression. Or that several of the analyses were limited to circulating white blood cells and are thus mostly relevant to the immune system.

 

Here are some great resources they shared:

Now go over and subscribe!

They have great resources for students at the Genetic Science Learning Center, and for educators at their new Teach.Genetics site. You can also follow them for Twitter updates hereSign up for the Teach.Genetics mailing list from GSLC here. 

Pomodoro Organizer: Get Stuff Done

The Pomodoro Technique is an effective way to overcome procrastination, get started on big tasks (by breaking them into smaller tasks) and to use time effectively. Essentially, by “hacking” your brain’s reward pathway with manageable chunks of time and small reward breaks, it can help overcome the fear of getting going.

@sjtylrPomodoroImageThis graphic organizer (pdf) is to help set a plan for a working period, recognizing that: 

  • Setting  clear and realistic goal is essential
  • Breaking large tasks into smaller steps helps get things done
  • Rewards/short breaks keep the brain motivated
  • Setting an overall end time is also really important
  • A distraction-free environment will really help

Of course if, once you get going, you find “flow” and can’t stop working… then get it done!

For more ATL-related graphic organisers, click here.

Tech Tools: 

PomodoroFullScreenQR

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