Blog Archives

Transcription and Translation: AHL

Additional Higher Level:

Work through these tutorials from BioCoach online: TranscriptionTranslation

Essential Biology: 7.3 & 7.4 Transcription & Translation AHL

—————————————————————————————————————————————————

Further resources:

Transcription Details (fits DP Bio HL very well)

Translation Details (fits DP Bio HL very well)

MrHardy’s Wikispace (original author unknown):

Transcription (great for HL)

Translation (great for HL)

John Kyrk: (visit the parent site at www.johnkyrk.com – excellent)

Transcription (fits DP Bio HL very well)

Translation (fits DP Bio HL very well)

St. Olaf College

Transcription (clear and simple)

Translation (clear and simple)

WH Freeman

RNA Splicing tutorial (HL only)

Bio3400

Translation with a genetic code dictionary (shows position in the ribosome)

Some more in-depth animations (newly added):

Translation from Wiley Interscience

Translation from LSU Medschool

Translation from The Chinese University in Hong Kong

Protein targeting from Rockefeller University

Blame it on the DNA, from the Stanford Students:

Transcription and Translation (Core)

Start at the Learn.Genetics Firefly overview.

Core (AHL to follow):

Click on the shadowed images for animations and tutorials.

Essential Biology: 3.5 Transcription and Translation (SL/ Core Only)

Click4Biology page

More basic animations:

Learn.Genetics @ Utah

Transcribe and Translate (good, basic, interactive)

How do fireflies glow? (puts it in context)

University of Nebraska:

Protein Synthesis overview

DNA Replication (Core & AHL)

Class Presentation:

Essential Biology 3.4 DNA Replication (SL Students)

Essential Biology 3.4 & 7.2 DNA Replication (HL Students)

DNA Replication animations:

St. Olaf’s nice and clear animation.

Another clear one from Wiley.

Nicely illustrated one from Harvard.

John Kyrk’s complicated molecular animation.

The Meselsohn Stahl experiment from Sumanas.

More animations from North Harris College and from LearnersTV.

Revision materials:

Click4Biology pages: Core & HL

Wikipedia page

Here is the top-rated video on the subject on YouTube:

DNA Structure (Core and AHL)

Start with a decent tour of the basics, from Learn.Genetics.

Class presentation is here (click shadowed images for animations and movies):

Essential Biology: 3.3 (SL Only) DNA Structure

Essential Biology: 3.3 & 7.1 (HL) DNA Structure

Here’s a decent video from BBC AS Guru with David Suzuki:

And here’s a very stylized video of DNA structure from Hybrid Medical Animation. See if you can narrate it:

The story of the discovery of the double-helix structure is a good example international collaboration and competition, and led to the Nobel prize for Crick, Watson and Wilson (who we never hear about). You’ve got to feel for Rosalind Franklin – her work was key in their discovery and she wasn’t cited for it until after her death.

Here’s a great video, though the presenter sound like he has a mouth full of marbles:

MOLO: The Molecular Logic Project

The Molecular Logic Project aims “to improve the ability of all students to understand fundamental biological phenomena in terms of the interactions of atoms and molecules”. They achieve this with an extensive database of online java-based simluations and models for students to use. The animations are simple, and there are a lot of activities to choose from. To make it work, you’ll need to install their software.

Some highlights for IB Bio:

How do mutations affect protein folding?

How does gene mutation affect protein folding?

How does gene mutation affect protein folding?

Sickle cell anemia

Cell growth and regulation

DNA

Properties of Water

And loads more here: Biology, Molecular Biology (Chem of life), Physics/Chemistry.

DNA Structure (Core and AHL)

This is a short one – class presentation is here (click shadowed images for animations and movies):

Here’s a decent video from BBC AS Guru with David Suzuki:

And here’s a very stylized video of DNA structure from Hybrid Medical Animation. See if you can narrate it:

The story of the discovery of the double-helix structure is a good example international collaboration and competition, and led to the Nobel prize for Crick, Watson and Wilson (who we never hear about). You’ve got to feel for Rosalind Franklin – her work was key in their discovery and she wasn’t cited for it until after her death.

Here’s a great video, though the presenter sound like he has a mouth full of marbles:

Secrets of the Sequence – The Discovery of DNA

This 9-minute clip is an ideal ‘watcher’ to go along with the reader in the Course Companion – it tells the story of the discovery of the DNA double helix structure by Watson and Crick and how their discovery was dependant on the prior work of Rosalind Franklin and the compeitive/cooperative nature of research:

This clip  is taken from the vdeo lesson resource provided by Virginia Commonwealth University’s ‘Secrets of the Sequence’ website. They have 50 different videos, each with accompanying lesson plans and activities.

They also have a YouTube channel: VCULifeSciences.

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: