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The Greenhouse Effect

Here is the class presentation – shadowed images are links. I’ve included the slides from G3 on the ozone layer. Make sure you understand that the greenhouse effect itself is a natural phenomenon, enhanced by human activity. Be sure also to distinguish between the greenhouse gases in the troposphere and ozone layer – they are in different positions, with different functions.

Essential Biology 5.2 and G3: The Greenhouse Effect and Impacts of Humans on Ecosystems.

Click4Biology:The Greenhouse Effect

More decent resources from Cutting Edge

Use these CO2 data to plot trends and annual cycles with a spreadhseet.

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Impacts of Humans on Ecosystems

For Option G: Ecology and Conservation. Because we’re learning this concurrently with the Ecology and Evolution core topic, the Essential Biology document has been rolled into one: Essential Biology 5.2 & G3 – Greenhouse Effect and Impacts of Humans on Ecosystems.

The presentation on The Greenhouse Effect will follow soon.

The Cove

Winner of the Sundance 2009 audience award:

Find out more about the cove here:

Official Website

IMDB.com

If you get the chance to see it, think about how it links with the Ecology and Conservation unit:

What is happening in terms of bioaccumulation and biomagnification of toxins?

Is this approach to the dolphin populations sustainable?

ToK Link:

The actions portrayed in the movie are considered by many to be unethical but by those committing them to be a necessary part of life. Think about what determines one’s set of personal ethics – what parts of our own lives might be considered unethical by others? Are there actions we carry out which are unethical but which we choose not to think about because it is uncomfortable or inconvenient to do so?

International Mindedness:

How does this method of farming compare to intensive cattle and poultry farming in other industrialised countries?

Here’s a short clip of an intensively-farmed chicken’s life:

And you and find out more about it on Channel 4’s Hugh’s Chicken Run page.

PulseProject.org – Lectures and Podcasts in Science

PulseProject is an interesting collection of video lectures and podcasts in science. It is aimed at university and IBDP-level (or A-level) students and educators as well as the general (well informed) public. Looking through their list of lectures and videos, there is some leaning towards eugenics and psychology, though there are many that might be of specific interest to IB Biology students:

Genetics & Evolution:

GM Crops and global food security Chris Leaver

Where did you leave your genetic fingerprint? Katharine Wright

Genes and Human History Gil McVean

Descent of the Dinosaurs Chris Jarvis

Music of Life: a new view on nature and nurture Denis Noble

What makes us human? Robin Dunbar

The practice of Eugenics in Estonia Ken Kalling

Ecology:

Saving the Asian Apes (Indonesia link!) Susan Cheyne

Exploring the Ecology of Insects Mike Bonsall

Seven Years to Save the Planet (Climate Change) Bill McGuire

And some bits from our heroes:

Ben Goldacre at Skeptics in the Pub

Marcus du Sautoy on A mathematician’s journey through symmetry

Ruchard Wiseman (the Quirkology guy) on the luck factor

Life After People

Thanks to Bro Taylor for this one.

The History Channel ran a special called “Life After People“, about- surprisingly enough- life after people. He described it as “like ‘I Am Legend’ but not rubbish.”

What would happen if we all disappeared? How long would it be before animals moved back into the cities? how long would electricity keep being generated? Would buildings crumble?

It helps us realise that we are never in a position to ‘save the world’ – only life as we know it. The world will be fine long after we are gone. Why not visit their microsite and see if you would survive?

The save tag is not enabled on the GoogleVideo page, but you can save it by clicking here (via KeepVid).

Five things you need to know about the oceans

Homework for my HL class:complete the Fisheries Management sheet and make notes on international measures that can be taken to promote conservation of fish stocks.

Resources: watch this, read the article and then check the webpage at MarineBio.org.

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